Charitable Access Program

The Charitable Access Program (CAP) has been established in the United States through the Sanofi Genzyme Charitable Foundation, Inc. The program is committed to providing Fabrazyme to individuals who:

  • Medically need Fabrazyme and
  • Are uninsured or have inadequate insurance coverage for Fabrazyme

Qualified individuals with Fabry disease whose physicians have recommended treatment with Fabrazyme may be eligible for the Charitable Access Program. If you are ineligible for our program, your Sanofi Genzyme Case Manager will work with you and your health care providers to explore alternative coverage options.

To be considered for the program, you will be asked to provide the following:

  • A Letter of Intent to Treat with Fabrazyme from your physician
  • A Statement of Medical Necessity from your physician
  • A completed program application

Your Sanofi Genzyme Case Manager will coordinate with you and your physician to help obtain the necessary documentation and will keep you updated on the status of your application.

Applications are reviewed on a monthly basis and are kept confidential by the Charitable Access Program Committee.

Please note that the Charitable Access Program is considered a temporary program. Patients and their families are expected to continue exploring alternative resources with the assistance of a Sanofi Genzyme Case Manager. These may include:

  • Private insurance
  • Government programs

To Learn More

If you have questions about the Sanofi Genzyme Charitable Access Program, please call 1-800-745-4447, Option 3 to speak with a Sanofi Genzyme Case Manager.


Click here for additional information regarding the Charitable Access Program or to request an application form – CharitableAccessProgram@genzyme.com

Disclaimer: the Sanofi Genzyme Charitable Access Program may be discontinued at anytime at the discretion of the Charitable Access Program Committee

Indication and Usage

Fabrazyme® (agalsidase beta) is indicated for use in patients with Fabry disease. Fabrazyme reduces globotriaosylceramide (GL-3) deposition in capillary endothelium of the kidney and certain other cell types. The reduction of GL-3 inclusions suggests that Fabrazyme may ameliorate disease expression; however, the relationship of GL-3 inclusion reduction to specific clinical manifestations of Fabry disease has not been established.

Important Safety Information

Life-threatening anaphylactic and severe allergic reactions have been observed in patients during Fabrazyme infusions. In clinical trials and postmarketing safety experience, approximately 1% of patients developed anaphylactic or severe allergic reactions during Fabrazyme infusions. Reactions have included localized angioedema (including swelling of the face, mouth, and throat), bronchospasm, hypotension, generalized urticaria, dysphagia, rash, dyspnea, flushing, chest discomfort, pruritus, and nasal congestion. Interventions have included cardiopulmonary resuscitation, oxygen supplementation, IV fluids, hospitalization, and treatment with inhaled beta-adrenergic agonists, antihistamines, epinephrine, and IV corticosteroids. If severe allergic or anaphylactic reactions occur, immediately discontinue administration of Fabrazyme and provide necessary emergency treatment. Because of the potential for severe allergic reactions, appropriate medical support measures should be readily available when Fabrazyme is administered.

  • In patients experiencing infusion reactions, pretreatment with an antipyretic and antihistamine is recommended.
  • Infusion reactions occurred in some patients after receiving pretreatment with antipyretics, antihistamines, and oral steroids.
  • If an infusion reaction occurs, decreasing the infusion rate, temporarily stopping the infusion, and/or administrating additional antipyretics, antihistamines, and/or steroids may ameliorate the symptoms.
  • If severe infusion reactions occur, immediate discontinuation of the administration of Fabrazyme should be considered, and appropriate medical treatment should be initiated.
  • Severe reactions are generally managed with administration of antihistamines, corticosteroids, intravenous fluids, and/or oxygen when clinically indicated.
  • Because of the potential for severe infusion reactions, appropriate medical support measures should be readily available when Fabrazyme is administered.

Re-administration of Fabrazyme to patients who have previously experienced severe or serious allergic reactions to Fabrazyme should be done only after careful consideration of the risks and benefits of continued treatment, and only under the direct supervision of qualified personnel and with appropriate medical support measures readily available.

The most common adverse reactions reported are infusion reactions, some of which were severe. Infusion reactions occurred in approximately 50-55% of patients during Fabrazyme administration in clinical trials. Serious and/or frequently occurring (≥ 5% incidence) related adverse reactions consisted of one or more of the following: chills, fever, feeling hot or cold, dyspnea, nausea, flushing, headache, vomiting, paresthesia, fatigue, pruritus, pain in extremity, hypertension, chest pain, throat tightness, abdominal pain, dizziness, tachycardia, nasal congestion, diarrhea, edema peripheral, myalgia, back pain, pallor, bradycardia, urticaria, hypotension, face edema, rash, and somnolence.

  • Patients with advanced Fabry disease may have compromised cardiac function, which may predispose them to a higher risk of severe complications from infusion reactions. Patients with compromised cardiac function should be monitored closely if the decision is made to administer Fabrazyme.
  • Other serious adverse events reported in clinical studies included stroke, pain, ataxia, bradycardia, cardiac arrhythmia, cardiac arrest, decreased cardiac output, vertigo, hypoacousia, and nephrotic syndrome. These adverse events also occur as manifestations of Fabry disease; an alteration in frequency or severity cannot be determined from the small numbers of patients studied.
  • Severe and serious infusion related reactions have been reported in postmarketing experience, some of which were life threatening including anaphylactic shock. In addition to the above adverse reactions, the following have been reported during postmarketing use of Fabrazyme: arthralgia, asthenia, erythema, hyperhidrosis, infusion site reaction, lacrimation increased, leukocytoclastic vasculitis, lymphadenopathy, hypoesthesia, oral hypoesthesia, palpitations, rhinorrhea, oxygen saturation decreased and hypoxia.
  • Adverse reactions (regardless of relationship) resulting in death reported in the postmarketing setting with Fabrazyme treatment included cardiorespiratory arrest, respiratory failure, cardiac failure, sepsis, cerebrovascular accident, myocardial infarction, renal failure, and pneumonia. Some of these reactions were reported in Fabry disease patients with significant underlying disease.

The safety and efficacy in patients younger than 8 years of age have not been evaluated.

Most patients who develop IgG antibodies do so within the first three months of exposure. IgG seroconversion in pediatric patients was associated with prolonged half-life of Fabrazyme, a phenomenon rarely observed in adult patients.

In clinical trials, a few patients developed IgE or skin test reactivity specific to Fabrazyme. Physicians should consider testing for IgE in patients who experienced suspected allergic reactions and consider the risks and benefits of continued treatment in patients with anti-Fabrazyme IgE antibodies.

Fabrazyme is available by prescription only. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/safety/medwatch or call 1‑800‑FDA‑1088. You may also contact Sanofi Genzyme at 1-800-745-4447, option 2. To learn more, please see the full prescribing information (PDF) or contact Sanofi Genzyme at 1-800-745-4447.